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Is Chip Kelly Slowing Down the Ducks?

Is he whispering, "slow down"?

Is Chip Kelly Slowing Down the Ducks?

Gabe Judah
Reported by Gabe Judah on January 7, 2013
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Is Chip Kelly Slowing Down the Ducks?

Okay, breathe.  As of this morning, it appears that the Ducks coach has decided to stick around.  I think everybody, outside of Mark Helfrich, can breathe that big sigh of relief.  Done.  Now let’s talk about what we saw in the Fiesta Bowl Thursday night.

Judging by the last few games of the season, I’m a bit blurry about Oregon’s “blur” offensive.  Originally it was an offense that was going to run its plays at break-neck (or knee, from whiner Nicky Saban’s perspective) speed.  Maybe it’s just me, but my eyes tell me that Chip has begun to consider the defense in a way that he hasn’t before.  We saw Oregon’s offense at full speed a couple times against Kansas State.  The series right before the half was definitely full speed, but what about the rest of the game?  It was something like three quarter speed.  Fast enough to prevent defensive substitutions and cause some confusion, but not so fast the linemen were caught before they could get in their stance, and safeties were caught setting the corners.  The offense was different–slower.

Kelly has always said he’s not a one-trick Duck.  He has repeated that he has no signature offense.  His offense is the one he thinks will lead to a victory.  Maybe, against certain opponents,  that offense is one that moves at a slightly different pace, in order to allow the defense to breathe against a sledge hammer offense like K State and Stanford.  I, for one, am happy to see some variation week to week in what our offense does.  I bet so is Nick Aliotti and his boys.

 


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Gabe Judah

Gabe JudahGabe Judah is a high school educator, two time UofO graduate, a frenzied father of two, a fortunate husband of one, and a thoughtful fan of Duck athletics. While at the UofO, Gave pitched for the club baseball team, but perhaps his greatest contribution to Oregon sports was when he helped a Sporting News All-American safety pass a 200 level Spanish class.View all posts by Gabe Judah →


 

 

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  • Section38ForLife

    I think he slowed it down to show the NFL that his offense will work at the next level (Showing he’s no “one-trick pony”). It was just fast enough to keep the D from subbing, so the Big D linemen would still have their hearts racing at 170 bpm, but slow enough to make the right play. Works for me!