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Opponent Analysis: Keys to Arkansas State (video)

Opponent Analysis: Keys to Arkansas State (video)

Josh Schlichter
Reported by Josh Schlichter on August 31, 2012
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| 4 Comments

It’s football time in Eugene, as the Ducks are opening their season at home this year against Coach Gus Malzahn and the Arkansas State Red Wolves, a 10-win team in 2011 that features the Sun Belt Conference Player of the Year in quarterback Ryan Aplin.

The last time Gus Malzahn faced Oregon, he found himself utterly stumped against the quick, but stout Oregon defense in the 2010 national championship game. Now, without Cam Newton, Gus Malzahn’s offense looked a lot different at Auburn last season. Instead of pounding away with his super-freak athlete in Newton, Malzahn payed homage to his roots in the Wing-T offense, and used misdirection and leverage to compensate for the change in personnel during the 2011 season.

We’ll take a look at the inverted veer, screen passes, end around counters, and more in our first opponent analysis video of the 2012 season. Let’s learn more about the Arkansas State Red Wolves:


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Josh Schlichter

Josh SchlichterJosh is a College Football enthusiast from sunny Southern California. He has written for several self-operated prep sports blogs, as well as multiple SB Nation sites. In High School, Josh played football for four years, and helped create and operate the team's no-huddle system. Most of Josh's football knowledge branches from watching College Football his entire life, and is backed up by his first hand experience in both option and spread offenses. Above all, though, he is a proud student at the University of Oregon.@joshschlichterView all posts by Josh Schlichter →


 

 

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  • SeanG

    Nice work, Josh. Nice identification of the “inverted” zone read; something I had not heard of before. I don’t recommend Aplin pull that much unless he likes teethfuls of Taylor Hart.

  • Sham-I-Am

    When you have a quarterback the size of a defensive end, the inverted veer seems less risky than running your tailback up the middle. QBs like Newton or Pryor change the game.