Miami Dolphins: Dion Jordan to Linebacker?

Former Oregon defensive end Dion Jordan currently shares the crown as one of the highest NFL draft selections from the Eugene campus. The Miami Dolphins chose Jordan with the third overall pick in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft, hoping to bolster their defensive line. But according to multiple media sources, the Dolphins are now considering moving Jordan to linebacker full time, an opportunity that would allow the immensely talented defender to see more playing time in the 2015 season.

Jordan arrived at Oregon recruited as one the nation’s top tight ends. But the Phoenix, AZ, native demonstrated an ability to play just about anywhere on the field.

The problem for Oregon defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti was finding a permanent position for a freak athlete with size, strength, football acumen, and energy to do it all.

The 6’6″, 250 lbs. Jordan found his niche with the Ducks as both a potent edge rusher and intimidating tackler beyond the trenches, a hybrid player alternating between defensive end and linebacker.

The first team All Pac-12 player also occasionally covered opposing receivers and tight ends, a testament to his speed and versatility.

Miami’s defensive coordinator Kevin Coyle has both his defensive ends locked down with Cameron Wake and Olivier Vernon. However, Coyle recognizes Jordan’s unique abilities and wants to maximize his assets next season.


In Jordan’s final season at Oregon, Jordan had 44 total tackles, 10.5 going for a loss, five sacks, three forced fumbles, and an interception.

In his two seasons in the NFL, Jordan has seen limited time due to suspensions and injuries. But with the release of starting OLB Philip Wheeler, Jordan is considered by the Miami coaching staff as a viable candidate for the Dolphins’ starting strong side linebacker position.

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